Creating a Digital Story using Power Point Presentation

"Digital Storytelling takes the ancient art of oral storytelling and engages the palette of technical tools to weave personal tales using images, graphics, music, and sound mixed together with the author's own story voice."-Bernajean Porter, Digitales.

Telling a digital story successfully depends on one's ability to plan the process first. Compiled below are several step-by-step methods, website links, and article abstracts that will guide an individual through the digital storytelling process.

The students will create a video about one of the topics in the PeHMA curriculum guide using the power point presentation and save it as a movie.

PART ONE: Define, Collect, Decide
1. Select a topic for your digital story.

2. Create a folder on the desktop where you can store the materials you find.

3. Search for image resources for your story, including: pictures, drawings, photographs, maps, charts, etc. -Save these resources in your folder.

4. Try to locate audio resources such as music, speeches, interviews, and sound effects. -Save these resources in your folder.

5. Try to find informational content, which might come from web sites, word processed documents, or PowerPoint slides. -Save these resources in your folder.

6. Begin thinking of the purpose of your story. Are you trying to inform, convince, provoke, question?

 

PART TWO: Select, Import, Create
1. Select the images you would like to use for your digital story.

2. Select the audio you would like to use for your digital story.

3. Select the content and text you would like to use for your digital story.

4. Import images into Photo Story (Note: Photo Story is free software available for download and use on Windows XP computers from Microsoft).

5. Import audio into Photo Story.

6. Modify number of images and/or image order, if necessary.

 

PART THREE: Decide, Write, Record, Finalize
1. Decide on the purpose and point of view of your digital story.

2. Write a script that will be used as narration in your digital story AND provides the purpose and point of view you have chosen.

3. Use a computer microphone and record the narration of your script.

4. Import the narration into Photo Story.

5. Finalize your digital story by saving it as a Windows Media Video (.wmv) file.

 

PART FOUR: Demonstrate, Evaluate, Replicate
1. Show your digital story to your colleagues.

2. Gather feedback about how the story could be improved, expanded, and used in your classroom.

3. Teach your colleagues how to create their own digital stories.

4. Congratulate yourself for a job well done!

 

Category 4 Points 3 Points 2 Points 1 Point
1. Purpose of Story Establishes a purpose early on and maintains a clear focus throughout. Establishes a purpose early on and maintains focus for most of the presentation. There are a few lapses in focus, but the purpose is fairly clear. It is difficult to figure out the purpose of the presentation.          
2. Point of View The point of view is well developed and contributes to the overall meaning of the story. The point of view is stated but does not connect with each part of the story, although an attempt is made to connect it to the overall meaning of the story. The point of view is stated but no attempt is made to connect it to the overall meaning of the story. The point of view is only hinted at, or is difficult to discern.
3. Dramatic Question A meaningful dramatic question is asked and answered within the context of the story. A dramatic question is asked but not clearly answered within the context of the story. A dramatic question is hinted at but not clearly established within the context of the story. Little or no attempt is made to pose a dramatic question or answer it.
4. Choice of Content Contents create a distinct atmosphere or tone that matches different parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. Contents create an atmosphere or tone that matches some parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. An attempt was made to use contents to create an atmosphere/tone but it needed more work. Image choice is logical. Little or no attempt to use contents to create an appropriate atmosphere/tone.
5. Clarity of Voice Voice quality is clear and consistently audible throughout the presentation. Voice quality is clear and consistently audible throughout the majority (85-95%) of the presentation. Voice quality is clear and consistently audible through some (70-84%)of the presentation. Voice quality needs more attention.
6. Pacing of Narrative The pace (rhythm and voice punctuation) fits the story line and helps the audience really "get into" the story. Occasionally speaks too fast or too slowly for the story line. The pacing (rhythm and voice punctuation) is relatively engaging for the audience. Tries to use pacing (rhythm and voice punctuation), but it is often noticeable that the pacing does not fit the story line. Audience is not consistently engaged. No attempt to match the pace of the storytelling to the story line or the audience.
7. Meaningful Audio Soundtrack Music stirs a rich emotional response that matches the story line well. Images coordinated with the music. Music stirs a rich emotional response that somewhat matches the story line. Images mostly coordinated with the music. Music is ok, and not distracting, but it does not add much to the story. Not coordinated with images. Music is distracting, inappropriate, OR was not used.
8. Quality of Images Images create a distinct atmosphere or tone that matches different parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. Images create an atmosphere or tone that matches some parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors. An attempt was made to use images to create an atmosphere/tone but it needed more work. Image choice is logical. Little or no attempt to use images to create an appropriate atmosphere/tone.
9. Economy of Story Detail The story is told with exactly the right amount of detail throughout. It does not seem too short nor does it seem too long The story composition is typically good, though it seems to drag somewhat OR need slightly more detail in one or two sections. The story seems to need more editing. It is noticeably too long or too short in more than one section. The story needs extensive editing. It is too long or too short to be interesting.
10. Grammar and Language Usage Grammar and usage were correct (for the dialect chosen) and contributed to clarity, style and character development. Grammar and usage were typically correct (for the dialect chosen) and errors did not detract from the story. Grammar and usage were typically correct but errors detracted from story Repeated errors in grammar and usage distracted greatly from the story.

Creating a digital Story

Steps:

1. Write a script.

2. Develop a story board.

3. Locate images.

4. Create a digital story.

5. Share with others.

 

created by:

 Jay Mariel Ventura

 Hazem Egan

 BSE III-F (PeHMA)